BIBLE

Learn how the Bible stands tall in the field of “historic” literature, how it continues to be relevant in an ever-changing world, and why it can be trusted.

The Second Commandment: No Idols

By R. L. Wilson | October 21, 2021

In the first commandment, God forbad the recognition of any other god. Basically He told them, “I’m your God, not only because I chose you to be mine, but because in reality there are no other gods. Not even one.”


Now, God goes a step further and told His people that they were not to give the worship due to Him to any other thing—anything in heaven, in earth, or in the ocean depths. Nothing made (e.g., a wooden idol), nothing imagined (the power of the sun, moon, stars), nothing experienced (feelings, external forces), nothing natural (trees, rocks, gems) were to take His place as our object of worship.

The First Commandment: No Other Gods

By R. L. Wilson | October 14, 2021

The first thing God does as He begins to give His Law is to remind Moses and the Israelites of exactly who He is, and why they can trust Him. He is, after all, the God who chose them and who has brought them safely out of slavery in Egypt. He has already demonstrated both His power and His compassion. He has already demonstrated that He is able and willing to provide for them.

The Ten Commandments in Context

By R. L. Wilson | October 5, 2021

The Israelites had been living for 400 years as slaves to the Pharaohs in Egypt. Through a series of miraculous events, they have now been set free, and are on their way to the land God promised to give their nation.

Mary | Women in Jesus’ Genealogy

By R. L. Wilson | September 30, 2021

was engaged to Joseph who was a descendent of David (Luke 1:27). We know that she had lived, up to this point, a pretty virtuous life, good enough that the angel addressed her as “highly favored” (Luke 1:28). But we don’t know anything about her parents, what her interests might have been, what she enjoyed doing, what her hopes and dreams might have been.

Bathsheba | Women in Jesus’ Genealogy

By R. L. Wilson | September 21, 2021

The story of David and Bathsheba is a sad one in a number of ways. It put a permanent blight on David’s legacy.  We read in 1 Kings 15:5, “For David had done what was right in the eyes of the Lord and had not failed to keep any of the Lord’s commands all the days of his life—except in the case of Uriah the Hittite” (emphasis added).

Ruth | Women in Jesus’ Genealogy

By R. L. Wilson | September 15, 2021

As our story opens in chapter 1 of the book of Ruth, Naomi, Elimelech and their two sons have left Bethlehem (ironically, “the House of Bread”) because of a famine. They settle in Moab where Elimelech dies. Both sons, who have married Moabite women, also die, and Naomi is left a bitter widow.

Rahab | Women in Jesus’ Genealogy

By R. L. Wilson | September 8, 2021

Two men have been sent by Joshua to secretly check out the city of Jericho to get a feel for what the Israelites would face when they got there. Unfortunately, either they weren’t very good at covert operations, or they just stood out as “not one of us,” and the king of Jericho found out about them. He sent soldiers to the house of Rahab, where he had been told the men were staying.

Tamar | Women in Jesus’ Genealogy

By John Ankerberg Show Staff | August 31, 2021

We find the story of Tamar in Genesis 38. As the chapter opens, Jacob’s son Judah has married a Canaanite woman named Bath-shua, with whom he had three sons, Er, Onan and Shelah. Er, the oldest son, married a Canaanite woman named Tamar, but he died before they had any children. Genesis 38:7 explains, “But Er, Judah’s firstborn, was wicked in the Lord’s sight; so the Lord put him to death.” The exact nature of his wickedness is not given.

Defending the Historical Accuracy of the Bible

By The John Ankerberg Show | August 24, 2021

For many Christians, the Bible is primarily understood through the lens of faith. As a result, it can be difficult to know exactly how to respond when a non-believing friend…

Jesus’ Genealogy in Matthew’s Gospel

By R. L. Wilson | August 24, 2021

Okay, here’s a pretty random thought that’s not connected to anything I’ve written lately, but I’ve had it on my list of potential articles for several months. The question comes…